Rhinelander Rabbit

Rhinelander Rabbit

History of the Rhinelander Rabbit

The Rhinelander Rabbit first appeared in shows in 1902 in Germany. They were developed from a cross between a Harlequin buck and gray-checkered doe. Rhinelander was accepted as a breed in Germany in 1905. These rabbits were brought to the United States in 1923 and accepted by the American Rabbit Breeder’s Association (ARBA) in 1925.

Health

Like any rabbit, the Rhinelander’s diet must consist of 70 percent hay in order to stay healthy. Hay is the most important part of your rabbit’s diet. Pellets should only make up a small amount of your rabbit’s diet. They are high calorie and low fibre which leads to obesity and overgrown teeth. Fresh vegetables keep your rabbit’s intestines well hydrated, which helps with overall digestion. There are many vegetables that you can feed your rabbit, including celery, collard greens, green peppers, and radish tops. Rabbits have a sweet tooth and would probably love to eat a lot of fruit. However, because of the high sugar content, fruits should be fed only as treats.

Rhinelander Rabbit

Size, Weight, Shape & Ears

Rhinelander rabbit has a full-arch body shape and weight between 6-10 pounds (2.7-4.5kg). They have long limbs and the same width from shoulders to hip. It also has long ears, no longer than 4 inches (10 cm) and falling into a “V” shape.

Fur / Coat

The hair is short, dense, and silky. Weekly brushing is necessary.

Rhinelander Rabbit

Personality

They are very smart, they can learn things very quickly. Any rabbit’s personality is 95% breeder and handler, and 5% genes, which means that if the animal is handled correctly from the very beginning, it will become a lovely pet. The Rhinelander Rabbit’s docile, patient nature will make for a wonderful first-time pet.

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Docile

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Friendly

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Playful

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